Mudpond CFS3 Flight Model Upgrade Packages

There are now three Mudpond Flight Model Upgrade packages for Microsoft's Combat Flight Simulator.  The first two create standalone aircraft models using stock CFS3 components.  The third overwrites the original flight dynamics files with upgraded replacements. 

 

The first two packages (The Original Mudpond CFS3 Add-on Flight Model Upgrades)  are recommended for people who want to keep their stock installations intact, which allows them to join both on-line stock and 'mudpond' games.

 

The third package (The New Mudpond CFS3 Flight Dynamics Replacement Package) is recommend for people who are more interested in having improved flight dynamics available in off-line missions and campaigns written for stock aircraft.  This package also includes a stock flight dynamics re-installation program, so with just a few mouse clicks, you can revert to the stock flight dynamics and join on-line stock games.

 

The Original Mudpond CFS3 Add-on Flight Model Upgrades

These CFS3 Flight Model Upgrade Packages use the stock 3-D visual (m3d) and texture (dds) files that come on the original CFS3 CD and will only work in CFS3.   

 

Each CFS3 Flight Model Upgrade Package is easy to install and creates an independent set of realistic, standalone aircraft models.  The texture files can be repainted without affecting the original stock models. 

 

These new CFS3 aircraft all have new and improved flight and damage models.   The intent is to package a comprehensive set of easy to install models that perform as realistically as the simulator will allow, balance the plane-to-plane damage models, and maintain compatibility with the stock damage profiles. 

 

The basic design philosophy is 'keep it simple' by maintaining as much compatibility with the stock aircraft as possible.  The aircraft flight models are completely new, but the damage profiles are essentially the stock files updated to provide more realistic aircraft-to-aircraft 'damageability' using only the stock weapons and effects.

 

The installation packages are very compact since they contain only the installer, flight and damage model files. The size of the entire CFS3 Fighter Upgrade package for 19 aircraft is only about 250k bytes. The download times are minimal, and the installation process is fast and simple.
 


The Mudpond CFS3 Auto-Install Fighter Package will add the following new standalone aircraft to your CFS3 installation:
 

3mp_bf_109g_6
3mp_bf_109g_10
3mp_fw_190a_5
3mp_fw_190a_8
3mp_me_262a_1a
3mp_mosquito_mkvi
3mp_p_38j
3mp_p_38l
3mp_p_47d
3mp_p_47d_25
3mp_p_51b
3mp_p_51d
3mp_p_80a
3mp_spitfire_ixc
3mp_spitfire_ixe
3mp_tempest_mkv
3mp_typhoon_mkib
3mp_vampire_mki

Mudpond CFS3 Auto-Install Fighter Package (Last Updated 23 December 2004) Download It!

 

The Mudpond CFS3 Auto-Install Bomber Package will add the following new standalone aircraft to your CFS3 installation:

3mp_b_25c
3mp_p_26g
3mp_ju_88c_6

Mudpond CFS3 Auto-Install Bomber Package (Last Updated 30 December 2004) Download It!

To install the Mudpond CFS3 Upgrade Packages:

1) Download the installation program into any folder

2) Run  the installation program. 

The installation program assumes a standard CFS3 installation exists on the C: drive, but you have the option of browsing to and selecting any other CFS3 installation location you may have.

The default path for the installer is:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Games\Combat Flight Simulator 3

If you have installed CFS3 on some other disk or in any other directory tree, make sure that the install path points to the folder that contains the file 'CFS3.EXE'.
 

 

 

New! Mudpond CFS3 Flight Dynamics Replacement Package

The CFS3 Flight Dynamics Replacement Package gives you a direct flight dynamics upgrade for all the stock aircraft that come on the original CFS3 CD.  The flight dynamics and damage models included in the direct replacement package are the same high quality flight dynamics described below in the Flight Model Upgrade Notes sections and previously only available in the standalone configurations.  This direct replacement makes the improved flight dynamics immediately available in all missions written for stock aircraft. 

 

Please be advised however, that CFS3 will not allow you to join a CFS3 stock game on-line with these direct replacement files installed.  A stock flight dynamics re-installation program is also included in the  Flight Dynamics Replacement Package that can restore the stock files within seconds and allow you to join any stock game on-line.

 

The stock texture files ('.dds') are not affected by this installer, so any custom paint upgrades you've made will persist. The files changed are: aircraft.cfg, aerodynamic parameters ('.air') , and damage profiles ('.xdp' and '.bdp')

All replacement damage profiles have the same weapon configurations - guns and ammo - as stock and use only the stock weapons. All optional bomb and external fuel tank loadouts are also the same as stock.

 

The CFS3 Flight Dynamics Replacement Package contains two executable installation programs.

1) cfs3_mudpatch.exe - installs upgraded flight dynamics and damage models for each stock CFS3 aircraft.
2) cfs3_stock.exe - re-installs the stock CFS3 flight dynamics and damage model files.



To install the Mudpond CFS3 Flight Dynamics Replacement Package:

1) Download the zip archive file using the link below

2) Unzip the installation programs into any folder

3) Run  the appropriate installation program. 

The installation program assumes a standard CFS3 installation exists on the C: drive, but you have the option of browsing to and selecting any other CFS3 installation location you may have.

The default path for the installer is:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Games\Combat Flight Simulator 3

If you have installed CFS3 on some other disk or in any other directory tree, make sure that the install path points to the folder that contains the file 'CFS3.EXE'.

Mudpond CFS3 Flight Dynamics Replacement Package (Updated 30 March 2005) Download It!

 

 

CFS3 Flight Model Upgrade Notes

The goal for the CFS3 Mudpond flight models is to be as technically accurate as the simulator will allow. All of the Mudpond flight model upgrades have been tested extensively within the simulation environment, and all measurable flight performance characteristics conform very closely with published numbers for:

* Maximum Air Speeds
* Climb Rates
* Roll Rates
* Stall Speeds

Where absolute numbers are either questionable or not available, performance numbers for the Mudpond Upgrades have been derived from the available physical characteristics.
 

Control Feedback

Within the simulation environment control characteristics are somewhat problematic in that essential real-world feedback is non-existent. There is no substitute for 50 lbs of stick force, 5 G's of acceleration in a turn, or 250 lbs of effort on the rudder pedals.  However, all of the upgrade models have been developed and tested using a Microsoft Sidewinder Force Feedback 2 Joystick.

Accelerated Stalls and Compression Effects

An accelerated stall is any stall that occurs when the airspeed is higher than the normal 1G stall speed.  As aircraft speed increases, the likelyhood of a stall decreases and eventually goes to zero. The reason lies in real-world aerodynamics - as airspeed increases, air compression effects increase the stability of the aircraft.

In fact, that same increase in stability also limits how fast an aircraft can turn. Beyond a certain speed, the air compression effects increase to the point where the pilot simply cannot generate enough force to turn the aircraft, let alone stall it.  In some aircraft, air compression effects increased stick forces so much that the elevator seemed to freeze up.  Remember, these are WWII aircraft with mechanical control linkages, not post-WWII aircraft with hydraulic controls. 

When air compression effects are added to the simulated flight dynamics, the control characteristics of the flight models behave more like the real aircraft do. At low speeds, a virtual pilot can pull hard enough to force an aircraft model into an accelerated stall.  But at high speeds, compression effects reduce the ability to turn; and the aircraft simply won't stall.

Air compression effects can also cause rapid changes in pitch trim. Most WWII aircraft, particularly those with 'thick' conventional airfoils, had a tendency to nose-down as the airspeed increased. And by the way, this nose-down tendency also works against high-speed turning ability, further reducing the likelyhood of high-speed accelerated stalls.

Air compression effects were first experienced by pilots in high-performance WWII aircraft. The P-38 in particular gained a reputation for having 'compressibility problems', but it wasn't the only aircraft with this problem. It was simply the first production aircraft that was fast enough to encounter compression effects, and in a dive, the P-38 could easily achieve speeds where air compression became a serious problem.

The solution for the P-38, first seen on the P-38J-25, was to install dive flaps. When deployed, the dive flaps would simultaneously counteract the nose-down pitch and slow the aircraft. So you'll not only find compression problems modeled in the Mudpond Upgrade package, but the solution to it as well - at least on the aircraft that actually had the real-world solutions.

Each aircraft type has a different personality.  Despite the limitations imposed by compression effects, most can exceed their structural limits at high speeds, so watch the g-forces in turns!  Most of them also have a tendency to tuck the nose under at high speeds, so don't ignore the maximum speed limits in a dive or you'll find that some of them also make excellent lawn darts.   Most models tend to float around and feel somewhat mushy and harder to control at low speeds.  Prop torque effects can also be felt more at low speeds as well.  But as the speeds increase, the controls start to firm up and the aircraft become a lot more stable above 200 mph.   

Damage Model Upgrade Notes

The Mudpond damage profiles are essentially updated stock XDP files that use only the stock weapons and effects files.

The XDP updates have been concentrated on the wings and the fuselage. These are the largest target areas and because they tend to take the largest number of hits, they have the most influence on aircraft 'toughness'. These areas also have the most unrealistic plane-to-plane imbalances in the stock damage profiles.

Damage testing was done using the 50calBrowningM2_gun as the 'standard' weapon. Due to the way the simulator works, not every hit causes damage to an aircraft system, so the number of hits required to knock an aircraft down will vary. Records were kept of the number of 50 cal hits required to bring opposing aircraft down. Data was collected for at least 10 opposing aircraft of each basic type.

The results are that the amount of damage the Bf109's, P-51's, and Spits can take is about equal, typically between 50 and 60 'standard' rounds. The Fw190's, P-38's, P-47's, Mosquito, Typhoon and Tempest are a bit tougher, with a range between 70 and 90 rounds. But again, don't take these numbers as absolute. Concentrated fire on one area like a wing or cockpit can often bring an aircraft down with far fewer shots. By the same token, hits scattered across several wings and the fuselage can make it seem like an aircraft is nearly impossible to bring down.
 

The aircraft models on this web site are released as Freeware, Copyright (C) 2003-2004 - Jerry Beckwith.  The virtual aircraft files downloaded from this site may not be hosted on any other web site or re-distributed by any other means without written permission from the author. You may not charge anyone for these files, and these files may not be distributed as part of any commercial product without prior agreement from the author.

Disclaimer:

The flight models and installation programs hosted on this website are supplied on an as-is basis. The author offers no warranty of their fitness for any purpose whatsoever, and accepts no liability whatsoever for any loss or damage incurred by their use. These are not supported products. The author accepts no commitment or liability to address any problems that may be encountered in using them.